Escom Ltd Logo

Tel: 01743 243555

Email: info@escomifa.com

Investments

Are you making the best use of any spare capital or surplus income
Click Here

Protection

How much cash would your family need to maintain their current lifestyle if you die prematurely
Click Here

Pensions

When do you want to retire and how much income will you need?
Click Here

Mortgages

Do you want to reduce your current mortgage outlay or are you moving home?
Click Here

Business Protection

Business protection is all about insuring for the unexpected. It's a way of protecting your business if something goes wrong.


In the interests of financial security, business stability, and continuity - particularly for private limited companies where there may only be a small number of principal shareholders - it is important to provide a safety net following the loss of a shareholder
Key person insurance is an important form of business insurance. There is no legal definition for 'key person insurance'. In general, it can be described as an insurance policy taken out by a business to protect that business for potential financial losses that could arise from the death or extended incapacity of an important member of the business specified on the policy.
One of the great risks of a business partnership is that one of the partners may die or suffer a specified critical illness, with his or her share of the business passing to their beneficiaries. The safety net is a pre-arranged scheme to ensure the surviving partners have enough funds to buy out the departed partner's interest in the business.

Personal Finance

Britain's markets and pensions regulators on Thursday launched a joint strategy aimed at improving pensions outcomes for savers, amid concern that many people are entering retirement without enough income.
British inflation fell more than expected in September to a three-month low, offering some relief to consumers who have been squeezed financially since the Brexit vote.
British pay growth is struggling to exceed 3 percent and policymakers should not over-react to a recent improvement, Bank of England Deputy Governor Jon Cunliffe said on Wednesday, striking a more cautious tone than some of fellow policymakers.
The basic wages of workers in Britain rose at their fastest pace in nearly a decade over the summer months, backing up the Bank of England's view that a long period of weak pay increases is ending.
British taxes would need to rise to their highest since just after World War Two to sustainably meet Prime Minister Theresa May's goal of ending the austerity squeeze on public services, a think tank said ahead of her government's annual budget.