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Tel: 01743 243555

Email: info@escomifa.com

Investments

Are you making the best use of any spare capital or surplus income
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Protection

How much cash would your family need to maintain their current lifestyle if you die prematurely
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Pensions

When do you want to retire and how much income will you need?
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Mortgages

Do you want to reduce your current mortgage outlay or are you moving home?
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Business Protection

Business protection is all about insuring for the unexpected. It's a way of protecting your business if something goes wrong.


In the interests of financial security, business stability, and continuity - particularly for private limited companies where there may only be a small number of principal shareholders - it is important to provide a safety net following the loss of a shareholder
Key person insurance is an important form of business insurance. There is no legal definition for 'key person insurance'. In general, it can be described as an insurance policy taken out by a business to protect that business for potential financial losses that could arise from the death or extended incapacity of an important member of the business specified on the policy.
One of the great risks of a business partnership is that one of the partners may die or suffer a specified critical illness, with his or her share of the business passing to their beneficiaries. The safety net is a pre-arranged scheme to ensure the surviving partners have enough funds to buy out the departed partner's interest in the business.

Personal Finance

British inflation unexpectedly held steady last month, denting market confidence about a Bank of England interest rate hike next month and sending sterling to a 10-month low against the dollar.
Investment consultants who advise UK pension schemes face tougher rules under proposals outlined by Britain's anti-monopolies regulator on Wednesday.
The Bank of England will nudge up borrowing costs next month, according to economists polled by Reuters this week who have grown a bit more confident Britain will strike a free trade deal with the European Union.
Bank of England Governor Mark Carney said on Tuesday that a no-deal Brexit would have "big" economic consequences, prompt a review of interest rates and leave many bankers idle.
British workers' wages have risen at the slowest rate in six months despite a record number of people in jobs, challenging the Bank of England as it considers raising interest rates next month for only the second time since the financial crisis.